The goal of investing is more than just financial growth

Sustainable investing, an approach that integrates environmental, social and governance (ESG) criteria, is becoming a much sought-after strategy in the financial industry. Whether implemented through socially responsible investing (SRI) screening, ESG integration or impact investing, sustainable investing offers a growing number of options for investors interested in pursuing goals beyond financial growth when building their portfolios.

  • What is it?
  • What are the approaches?
  • Why should you consider it?

Please keep in mind that diversification and asset allocation do not ensure a profit or protect against a loss.

Bond prices and yields are subject to change based upon market conditions and availability. If bonds are sold prior to maturity, you may receive more or less than your initial investment. Holding bonds to term allows redemption at par value, barring default or an early call at the issuer’s option. There is an inverse relationship between interest rate movements and bond prices. Generally, when interest rates rise, bond prices fall and when interest rates fall, bond prices rise.

Income from municipal bonds is generally not subject to federal income taxation; however, it may be subject to state and local taxes and, for certain investors, to the alternative minimum tax. Income from taxable municipal bonds is subject to federal income taxation, and it may be subject to state and local taxes.

U.S. government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government and, if held to maturity, typically offer a fixed rate of return and guaranteed principal value. U.S. government bonds are issued and guaranteed as to the timely payment of principal and interest by the federal government. Treasury bills are certificates reflecting short-term (less than one year) obligations of the U.S. government.